Dear Google: Gender Discrimination Against Cougar Dating is Bad for Your Brand [& It's Probably Illegal and Definitely a Bit Evil]

So Google's advertising department is discriminating against Cougar dating services, i.e. sites that help older women and younger men hook up, by kicking CougarLife.com out of their advertising program. In an email message they are said to have clarified that they're against the "concept of 'cougar dating' as a whole".

So somebody with a high SAT score revealed their ageist, sexist prejudice and may have put Google in line for the sort of legal challenges that are a lot easier for a big company to lose than patent cases.

You know, scaring people off with your big d*ck of a legal fund ain't gonna work forever, Google, especially when it comes to social justice issues, i.e., older women deserve it just as much as older men.

So why are high SAT scorers cutting them off? My [ageist] guess is that the 20-somethings overrunning companies like Google don't want to be reminded that their parents are out trying to have sex with people their age. It makes them feel ickey, especially if it's their mom!

CougarLife.com is said to have ads on Facebook with whom they negotiated over ad content. Google, apparently, refused discussion.


Facebook Anti-Privacy Brand Attack Frenzy aka You Know Things Are Out of Hand When Michael Arrington Says They Are

Michael Arrington isn't really known for holding back, though maybe his move to Seattle is a sign he's softening (lol!), so when he says "Media Attacks On Facebook And Mark Zuckerberg Are Getting Out Of Hand", it's got to be a sign of channel oversaturation.

But that doesn't mean this tale is anywhere near an end.

Most people do care about privacy on and off-line, no matter what their age, and Facebook will pay for its privacy games, one way or another. They're well on their way to embedding "untrustworthy" into their public image.

Signs of the Time for Facebook:

Diaspora Project: Building the Anti-Facebook

Facebook's "Evil Interfaces"

Report: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Doesn’t Believe In Privacy